The DNA of Prose

Are there enough words?

The unique form of every human and every living thing we know of is derived from the sequencing of four basic nucleobases: adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine. Just four. All the diversity on this planet is manufactured by varying patterns of these same four building blocks.

And what does that have to do with writing?

Everything.

I doubt myself at times. All writers do. Will I run out of ideas? Will I run out of words? And then I think about that double helix, DNA, that has existed in every human and every animal that has ever walked this Earth. No two have ever been exactly alike. Over eons, no two the same. And yet they all formed from a foundation built with these four nucleobases.

My alphabet has twenty-six nucleobases. ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ. My words are made from six-fold as many differing pieces as the number required to build every living creature on the planet. All I have to do is order them in unique, intriguing, meaningful combinations. It sounds simple. It should be simple, and yet, it is often a challenge.

But when the ugly cloud of writer’s block breaks thunder over my creative landscape, I need only think of the DNA of prose. Those twenty-six blocks that promise endless possibilities. Could I run out of words? Can the universe run out of stars?

Happy writing.

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One response to “The DNA of Prose

  1. Pingback: The Tease – A New Feature | Edited by Mjollnir

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